Alan Moore not impressed by the modern super-hero

amAlan Moore, the writer of such seminal graphic novels Watchmen, The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, and V for Vendetta, related in an interview with The Guardian that he’s not too impressed by modern superheroes, and finds it “alarming” the audiences are flocking to comic book movies like The Avengers in droves. The interview was conducted with the notably eccentric writer while he was promoting his latest work Fashion Beast, a ten issue limited run based on the fairy tale Beauty and the Beast. Moore says he hasn’t read any superhero comics since completing Watchmen. He goes on to say, “I hate superheroes. I think they’re abominations. They don’t mean what they used to mean. They were originally in the hands of writers who would actively expand the imagination of their 9-13 year old audience. That was completely what they were meant to do and they were doing it excellently.”

Moore goes on to state, “These days, superhero comics think the audience is certainly not 9-13, it’s nothing to do with them. It’s an audience largely of 30-, 40-, 50-, 60- year old men, usually men. Someone came up with the term graphic novel. These readers latched onto it; they were simply interested in a way that could validate their continued love of Green Lantern or Spider-Man without appearing in some way emotionally subnormal. This is a significant rump of the superhero-addicted, mainstream-addicted audience. I don’t think the superhero stands for anything good. I think it’s a rather alarming sign if we’ve got audiences of adults going to see the Avengers movie and delighting in concepts and characters meant to entertain the 12-year old boys of the 1950s.”

Moore has long been considered a bit of an eccentric genius, and has distanced himself from the movies made from his works. His statements are a bit curious, as anyone who has read Watchmen or V for Vendetta probably would not find either book to be appropriate for a nine year old or even a thirteen year old. They contain themes and subject matter that younger audiences, for the most part, would have a hard time trying to comprehend. Could this be a case of envy on the author’s part? Or is he making a valid point? Let us know your thoughts in the comments below.

 

Thomas Juretus

Born in 1963. Enjoy videogames, movies, comics- anything that tells a story. Have written three novels (The Zarchler Chronicles Book One: The Cassandra Crisis, Shalgroth The Zarchler Chronicles: Book Two, Madman's War The Zarchler Chronicles: Book Three) all published and available through PublishAmerica. Currently working on my fourth book, a sci-fi/murder mystery.

Thomas Juretus

Born in 1963. Enjoy videogames, movies, comics- anything that tells a story. Have written three novels (The Zarchler Chronicles Book One: The Cassandra Crisis, Shalgroth The Zarchler Chronicles: Book Two, Madman's War The Zarchler Chronicles: Book Three) all published and available through PublishAmerica. Currently working on my fourth book, a sci-fi/murder mystery.

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